Therapeutic 

Approach

I am passionate about my therapeutic work and enjoy working collaboratively with my clients to help them overcome their difficulties.

 

I am approachable and compassionate and openly welcome feedback from my clients.

 

I have extensive training and experience in a number of evidence-based psychological treatment approaches.

 

I am able to work integratively, combining several therapeutic approaches in order to deliver individually tailored interventions.

Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT)

In CBT the therapist and client work together to find ways of reacting differently to thoughts and feelings (for example by challenging negative thoughts).

It also aims to bring about changes in behavior to help clients feel better. It is a structured approach that is usually aimed at a particular problem and the intervention is fairly brief (6-20 sessions).

CBT has a strong evidence base and the National Institute of Clinical Excellence (NICE) recommends CBT for depression, postnatal depression, anxiety, OCD, managing long-term illnesses and post-traumatic stress.

 

Systemic / Family System Therapy

Systemic Therapy is an approach used either with families, couples or individuals who understand psychological difficulties within the context of social relationships.

It explores the meanings of the difficulties within these contexts and sees them as 'attempted solutions'. Change is seen as possible within the system of the client’s relationships.

 

Psychosynthesis

Psychosynthesis is a therapeutic approach that focuses on personal growth and development.

It is based on the belief that individuals tend to synthesize various aspects of the self to become more evolved and self-actualized.

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT)

ACT (a type of CBT) aims to help people live full and meaningful lives, whilst effectively handling the pain and stresses that life inevitably brings. It teaches skills to deal with difficult thoughts and feelings and helps clients to clarify what is truly important and meaningful to them in their lives.

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT)

ACT (a type of CBT) aims to help people live full and meaningful lives, whilst effectively handling the pain and stresses that life inevitably brings. It teaches skills to deal with difficult thoughts and feelings and helps clients to clarify what is truly important and meaningful to them in their lives.

 
 

Gestalt

Gestalt therapy is a client-centered approach to psychotherapy that helps clients focus on the present and understand what is really happening in their lives right now, rather than what they may perceive to be happening based on past experience. 

Compassion Focussed Therapy (CFT)

CFT is a therapeutic approach that draws on ideas in evolution, social psychology, developmental psychology, and Buddhism, as well as the latest research in neuroscience. It includes practices to develop a compassionate mind, a self-soothing system to help create a better balance for clients. It uses a variety of different techniques such as mindfulness, breathing techniques, imagery, and letter writing. This approach is particularly suited to clients with high levels of shame and self-criticism. 

Transpersonal Psychotherapy

Transpersonal Psychotherapy is the approach that evolved from the humanistic work of American psychologist Abraham Maslow in the 1960's. It integrates traditional spiritual rituals into modern psychology and emphasizes positive influences and role models rather than concentrating on negative experiences. 

 
 
 

Mindfulness

Mindfulness aims to help people reduce stress, difficult thoughts and feelings through meditation-based practices. It involves intentionally switching off automatic pilot in order to be present, aware and responsive to our experiences. It has been recommended by NICE for people who have experience of recurrent depression, but has also been used for a range of other difficulties including pain, anxiety and stress.

 

Couples Counselling

Couples Counselling aims to help couples to overcome difficulties in their relationships with the help of the therapist. It is also recommended if partners have tried individual therapy and this has not helped.